Impact Of Split Testing In Internet Marketing

A tiny change in presentation or different phrase can mark the difference between a highly successful and popular ad and an ad that fails miserably.

An effective internet marketing campaign as opposed to one that fails is very small in difference. Because the details are so tiny between a marketing concept that works and one that fails, marketers often conduct ?split testing.?

Split testing is a sales tactic that tests two different sales pages, keywords, PPC copy and other online sales tools using an equal number of impressions/views to see which one converts more effectively. Split testing is one of the few research tools marketers can use and boy do they use it!

In layman?s terms, split testing is basically taking two different ads with very minor differences and proving which one works more effectively. The minor differences can range from color or size text, to a certain phrase.

Split testing must last for at least a few days. The concept is to see which one accumulates more clicks, especially setting a milestone at 40 to 50 clicks. If for example, the Money Back Guarantee? ad wins, then you now know that the simple phrase may make a small difference. Now you must gauge where you should put the phrase. How about the beginning of your article? How about the end? Sounds like it’s time for another split test.

Once you have completed this technique, the marketer will find the highest performing ad. Split testing is also used in newsletters and sales copy, or anything else that helps increase conversions.

Internet marketing is still in its early stages and still a work of art. Marketers are doing more to understand the business, but they are still a ways from landing on any one true formula. Split testing is one of the most precise types of techniques they have at their disposal.

Marketers who incorporate split testing find more conversions than companies that do not. It?s proven to help your sales, so it comes at no surprise that more and more marketers are using this simple approach.

Source: Graham McKenzie